Casino Design Book


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Casino Design Book

Das deutsche App deutsche casino bonus ohne einzahlung release form merkur book of ra deluxe online casino free game software price list novoline. Addiction by Design ist ein erschienenes Sachbuch von Natasha Dow Schüll, das von Princeton University Press veröffentlicht wurde und das maschinelle Glücksspiel in Las Vegas beschreibt. Slot Machine Design, Graphics for online and land based games, VLT, AWP and Mobile Applications. Thematic Icons and Symbols, Concepts, Characters.

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Addiction by Design ist ein erschienenes Sachbuch von Natasha Dow Schüll, das von Princeton University Press veröffentlicht wurde und das maschinelle Glücksspiel in Las Vegas beschreibt. Schull, N: Addiction by Design: Machine Gambling in Las Vegas | Schüll, Natasha Natasha Dow Schüll, an anthropologist at MIT, has written a timely book. Designing casinos to dominate the competition: The Friedman international standards of casino design | | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle. erschien bei der Princeton University Press, ich habe es als Kindle-E-​Book gelesen. Die Spielsüchtige arbeitet im Hotel des MGM-Casinos. Ein Game-Designer gesteht im Buch gar, dass er zu den Meetings der. PDF | Was hat die Gambling-Industrie mit der gegenwärtigen In book: digma - Zeitschrift für Datenrecht und Informationssicherheit (pp). Online casino book of ra bonus - 25 Years Online. Any bets - Only for our Сustomers. All types of Сryptocurrencies - Payment Without Commission. Casino slots book of ra echtgeld download chip - Anonymous Payments - Because We are Leaders. Any Currency - Payment Without Commission. Black Jack.

Casino Design Book

Casino slots book of ra echtgeld download chip - Anonymous Payments - Because We are Leaders. Any Currency - Payment Without Commission. Black Jack. Slot Machine Design, Graphics for online and land based games, VLT, AWP and Mobile Applications. Thematic Icons and Symbols, Concepts, Characters. Das deutsche App deutsche casino bonus ohne einzahlung release form merkur book of ra deluxe online casino free game software price list novoline. Addiction by Design: Machine Gambling in Las Vegas reads like a combination of Scientific American's number puzzles and the 'blue Book' of Alcoholics. Slot Machine Design, Graphics for online and land based games, VLT, AWP and Mobile Applications. Thematic Icons and Symbols, Concepts, Characters. Das deutsche App deutsche casino bonus ohne einzahlung release form merkur book of ra deluxe online casino free game software price list novoline.

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Groundbreaking research into designing casinos to increase player counts, win, and profitability.

Get A Copy. More Details Original Title. Designing casinos to dominate the competition: The Friedman international standards of casino design.

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Mar 06, Dan rated it really liked it. Designing Casino to Dominate the Competition is essentially an analysis of the design of casinos location of tables, entrances, amenities, colors in the casino, amount of light, even ceiling height and how this effects gamblers in their decision to stay in a casino for a period of time.

Bill does a good job and gathering the data and presenting it in a reasonable, albeit subjective, argument on how to design a casino to maximize profitability.

View 1 comment. Hso rated it really liked it Mar 20, Sandy rated it it was amazing Oct 21, Raghav rated it it was amazing Oct 14, Pritesh rated it really liked it Dec 16, Nae Nicolae rated it it was amazing Jun 16, Ashlee added it Mar 04, Jessica added it Oct 11, Robert marked it as to-read Dec 11, Daniel Taylor marked it as to-read May 20, Brian marked it as to-read Nov 25, Sharmisri added it Dec 23, Anh Trang marked it as to-read Mar 17, Sandro Moita marked it as to-read Mar 23, Another is dedicated to attempts by addicts to "cure" themselves.

Oh, and: there is a bunch of discussion of how those in the industry justify their business model, ranging from "it's our responsibility to shareholders to make as much money as legally possible," to "the problem isn't with our business model, it's with the addicts.

Machine gaming is much more profitable for casino owners than live gaming - so profitable that there is hardly a shop or gas station in Las Vegas that doesn't have its bank of electronic poker machines or straight slots.

Locals tend to prefer video poker to straight slots; tourists tend to prefer the slots. Anyway, an interesting book, at least for those at least vaguely interested in such things.

Aug 16, Theresa Claire Barton rated it it was amazing Shelves: reviewed. Machine gambling is, as prof dow-schull reveals, more bizarre beneath the surface.

Basically repeat gamblers will spend not just excessive -- barely physically plausible -- amounts of time gambling on machines.

They will not go to the bathroom, not eat, and refuse to be disturbed. Dow Schull cites cases where players did not move from their seats when a neighbor is on the floor convulsing from a heart attack, becoming an impediment to paramedics.

The genius of the game design is hardly revolutionary -- basic positive reinforcement with variable-reward scheduling -- rather the way the players are sucked in to the elusive 'zone,' the way the designers continually ratchet up the intensity of play, and the way the play perfectly stimulates some neural circuits that cause the players to spend maximum time on device is fascinating and horrifying.

Dow Schull's humble choice of subject matter, largely a vice of the elderly, the female, and the working class, and her appraisal of their inescapable hell TIL casinos will refill oxygen tanks and perscriptions if you play enough!

I'm struck by the similarity between wireheading where one stimulates the pleasures of one's brain and machine gambling.

Also by the way our tiny smartphone 'addictions' could actually be so much worse. Dec 06, Wilte rated it it was ok. I liked the psychological aspects on design the best, less so the ethnographic descriptions and the emphasis on addiction.

Modern cultures, he claimed, were distinguished by games involving a tension between agon and alea—the former demanding an assertion of will, the latter demanding surrender to chance.

Although video poker machines took in half as much money as three-reel slots per unit of time, they brought in twice as much revenue because gamblers played at them four times as long.

Upon further investigation it was discovered that the men were exiting a nearby showroom near the machines at the close of a revue performance and pestering the young women.

Yet the seeming alignment between players and the industry around the quest to manage contingency, I have argued throughout this book, masks asymmetries of risk and reward, control and compulsion, loss and gain.

Jul 07, Robert A rated it really liked it. Surprising, but quite academic book about gambling addiction to machines slot machines.

The machines have gotten more and more computerized and everything has been done to keep people playing for as long as possible. Many people use machine gambling as a way to escape life and its p Surprising, but quite academic book about gambling addiction to machines slot machines.

Many people use machine gambling as a way to escape life and its problems. They want to get completely lost in the game. They don't even really want to win, just keep playing.

Many people lose all their savings and then need government assistance while casino's prosper. This is especially a problem as many states have legalized gambling to raise revenues, but this creates many new problems.

An exhaustive look at an addiction you probably weren't aware of, and if you WERE aware of it you probably didn't know how complex it was.

There is no stone left unturned in this book. You get to look at every aspect of machine gambling addiction, from the people who make em to the people who put em out to the people who use em.

May slow down sometimes, but for the most part there's always a new piece of information that keeps you reading.

After this, it's hard to look at slots the same way. Jun 06, Mijael Feldman rated it it was amazing. It's a perfect guide to understand how to make people addicted, hopefully in your case for a good purpose.

Sounds like the same methods Facebook, instagram, Netflix and other social networks are using to keep us hooked. The author is sometimes repetitive in her examples, which makes the boom a little boring at times.

Jul 29, Jim rated it really liked it. After reading this book it strikes me that many of the techniques used in Las Vegas machine gaming are so deceptive they should be illegal--virtual reel mapping, losses disguised as wins, and overproduction of "near misses" Vegas permits 6X what would occur by chance in a fair game all give players deceptively false information about their chances.

Oct 28, Joseph rated it liked it. A bit too long I read it as a part of a research project. I found what i needed but after part one and two i lost interest in gambling and it got too caught up with anecdotes.

Oct 18, Tong rated it liked it. Very good information, but with too many words May 08, Ietrio rated it did not like it Shelves: junk. A more sincere title would have been "Superstition by mediocre writing style.

May 04, Daniel Potts rated it it was amazing Shelves: sociology , non-fiction , theory , anthropology , psychology , imperialism , technology , architecture , capitalism.

Insanely good. Observant, concise, erudite, and well organised. An extraordinary analysis of the nightmarish confluence of technology, capitalism, and addiction.

May 05, Aldo Biagini rated it liked it. Good book that elaborates well on the many different facets involved in machine gambling and addiction.

Sometimes it gets a little repetitive, though. Overall, it's worth it. Aug 12, Kevin Whitaker rated it liked it Shelves: behavior.

Fun topic to read about, and some nice nuggets, but quite long given the subject and seemed pretty dated at this point -- would love to read an update.

Three things I learned: 1. Casino design tips: Lighting should be stead Fun topic to read about, and some nice nuggets, but quite long given the subject and seemed pretty dated at this point -- would love to read an update.

Casino design tips: Lighting should be steady and indirect; sound should not reverberate; keep visibility limited so people focus on the games nearby; use curves rather than corners to keep people moving subconsciously these are for tourist casinos; local casinos should be standardized and simple because they cater to repeat customers 3.

Lower-denomination, faster-pace-of-play games are gaining share to increase the number of "wins" a player receives even as they lose in aggregate Dec 14, Arash rated it it was amazing Shelves: habits-willpower , propaganda-manipulation.

A must read for anyone interested in users and designers of addictive systems. Jan 18, DJ Williams rated it liked it Shelves: nonfiction , behavioral.

This is a great great book. Highly recommend. Oct 11, Jonathan rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , Nov 13, Pete Welter rated it really liked it.

This book looks that phenomenon of machine gambling and the addiction that can form to this type of gambling. The gambling industry frames the addiction discussion entirely in terms of the users of its machines.

Addiction or gambling to excess is an internal problem with the person using the machine, either because they are genetically predisposed towards addictive behaviors, or because they are undisciplined and irrational.

What Schill demonstrates here though, is that the machine designers and This book looks that phenomenon of machine gambling and the addiction that can form to this type of gambling.

What Schill demonstrates here though, is that the machine designers and casinos spend huge amounts of time and money on figuring out exactly how to create environments and machines that are entirely focused on pushing human impulses at a deep level, and to fool rational thinking when it does arise.

At the same time, player tracking by casinos has never been more finely grained, so casinos have detailed information on players, both on an individual and aggregate basis.

It's this asymmetry that makes the battle between player and casino so lopsided. So, is it the machine, or is the individual? The answer for many of us comes down our personal philosophies, but the argument made here is that it is both, Schull gives a deep enough background and references enough research that if you are interested you can reasonably form your own opinion given the data.

For a rather academic topic, she writes in a pretty readable style, peppering the discussion with examples and people she ran across during her years of research on the topic.

Yes, many of the people who are hard-core gambling addicts presented in this book have personalities and backgrounds that lend themselves to addiction.

But there are just as many examples of the actions, large and small, that casinos and machine designers use to push the buttons of human cognition and emotion to make the machines hard to resist.

If you're not into gambling, why should you care about such a topic? Machine gambling is very much a microcosm of much of the advertising and marketing that drives our economy these days.

We are bombarded with messages about products and services and why we need them, and those items are designed and redesigned to fit what we want or desire.

Is it entirely up to us to ignore them? Or should we be saved from ourselves by regulations or laws? Is it right to allow advertisers to use any psychological trick in the book or technical edge to get us to buy something?

Should we be strong enough to resist? If you are interested in deeper knowledge of how machines are designed and created, the psychology behind casinon environments, or the topic of gambling addiction, this book comes highly recommended.

It's complete, detailed, and for this kind of book, a relatively entertaining read. Mar 27, Erhardt Graeff rated it really liked it. This is an amazing work of anthropology.

The amount and quality of research poured into the author's study of machine gambling makes for a convincing account of how the casino and gambling machine industries continue to refine and perfect slot machines, video poker machines, and other electronic gambling devices in order to keep gamblers in their stools and feeding money into the machine.

The odds are stacked against the average gambler in many ways beyond simply the random number generators pow This is an amazing work of anthropology.

The odds are stacked against the average gambler in many ways beyond simply the random number generators powering the spins of reels and deals of cards.

Not only does the author give us this view into the industry through technical and anecdotal details, but also offers an overview of local, national, and multi-national regulatory frameworks governing the industry: their complexity and ultimately their limitations.

The discussion of lobbying activities by the industry to focus the point of responsibility for gambling on the individual using arguments from neo-liberalism and funding research to build up analysis about problem gambler's individual psychology and predisposition rather than the role of the machines was fascinating.

The larger takeaway from the field of science, technology, and society is the revelations around how problem gambling is a co-construction between the machines and their human users.

The author offers heartbreaking accounts of gamblers who can't stop gambling, who have structured their lives around the practice, and hurt themselves and their families in the process.

We readers see what it means to be truly addicted to something. The effect is a deeply humanizing account of gambling addicts.

One advisory for potential readers: this is a piece of rigorous academic scholarship, whose audience may include lay readers and policymakers, but is definitely meant for other anthropologists and science, technology, and society scholars.

There are many references to philosophers and sociologists like Erving Goffman, Gilles Deleuze, Bruno Latour, and others.

This makes the book a very dense read. I appreciate the situation of the work in the academic literature but it definitely raises barriers to a broader audience.

That said, the author does an excellent job of constructing a road map through the work and helping readers keep track of where they are in her argument and where threads are coming together, which really helps the accessibility.

Overall, I highly recommend Addiction by Design. View 1 comment. May 06, Jeff rated it liked it. Data comes from a huge range of sources and presented in a balanced fashion.

The consequences of pokies are pretty obvious even to those who are affected by them but unable to stop and this book details this but balances it with the recognition that people make these decisions themselves.

The consequences of free choice and the market are discussed at length and this dynamic was the most fascinat really enjoyed this book, really informative and didn't present the detail in a judgmental fashion.

The consequences of free choice and the market are discussed at length and this dynamic was the most fascinating part of the discussion thread that the book generates.

How much and how can you protect people from themselves. As with most addictions the tools that hurt the most vulnerable are chosen by the "victims" themselves but not all vulnerable people choose to gamble in this fashion To its credit the author recognizes that even the "seat belts" that the gaming industry propose have to be self regulating or gamblers reject them outright.

This is further exploration of the doctrine of free choice and a market that provides choices: good and bad for people.

This is a very balanced book that with the overarching themes of the free market dynamic verses the harm these choices can create. Apr 10, Steven rated it liked it Shelves: big-people-books.

Addiction by Design takes a deep dive into why slot machines hold such a tight grip over users. And tightly they do grip!

The book begins with an account of a casino patron slumping over and having a heart attack. Fortunately, a quick intervention by the staff using an AED saves the patron's life.

But, next to the victim, and throughout the frantic event, sits another patron, mechanically playing away at a slot machine, never moving out of the way or even flinching as the life of another hangs Addiction by Design takes a deep dive into why slot machines hold such a tight grip over users.

But, next to the victim, and throughout the frantic event, sits another patron, mechanically playing away at a slot machine, never moving out of the way or even flinching as the life of another hangs in the balance.

In other accounts, players deplete their checking account, then their savings account, and finally max out their credit cards, all just to keep putting coins in a machine and watching to see what cards turn up.

The answer is in the title.

Sort order. Mar 06, Dan rated it really liked it. Designing Casino to Dominate the Competition is essentially an analysis of the design of casinos location of tables, entrances, amenities, colors in the casino, amount of light, even ceiling height and how this effects gamblers in their decision to stay in a casino for a period of time.

Bill does a good job and gathering the data and presenting it in a reasonable, albeit subjective, argument on how to design a casino to maximize profitability.

View 1 comment. Hso rated it really liked it Mar 20, Sandy rated it it was amazing Oct 21, Raghav rated it it was amazing Oct 14, Pritesh rated it really liked it Dec 16, Nae Nicolae rated it it was amazing Jun 16, Ashlee added it Mar 04, Jessica added it Oct 11, Robert marked it as to-read Dec 11, Daniel Taylor marked it as to-read May 20, Brian marked it as to-read Nov 25, Sharmisri added it Dec 23, Anh Trang marked it as to-read Mar 17, Sandro Moita marked it as to-read Mar 23, Ralph marked it as to-read Apr 25, Peter marked it as to-read May 03, Tiago Alves added it Sep 03, Agnellia Goloyugo added it Oct 01, Irakli marked it as to-read Dec 16, Martin marked it as to-read Feb 01, Clarees Odongo is currently reading it Feb 02, Ivneet Bhatia marked it as to-read Mar 28, Glenn added it Mar 31, LaFrance Hart marked it as to-read Apr 26, David Beaton marked it as to-read Apr 27, Gia Hien marked it as to-read May 15, Stephen Hinkle marked it as to-read Jul 18, Susxi Busxi marked it as to-read Sep 14, Philip Hong added it Oct 02, Sam Venzon Jr.

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Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem?

Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Recent decades have seen a dramatic shift away from social forms of gambling played around roulette wheels and card tables to solitary gambling at electronic terminals.

Drawing on fifteen years of field research in Las Vegas, anthropologist Natasha Dow Schull shows how the mechanical rhythm of electronic gambling pulls players into a trancelike state they call the "machine zone," in which daily worries, social demands, and even bodily awareness fade away.

Once in the zone, gambling addicts play not to win but simply to keep playing, for as long as possible--even at the cost of physical and economic exhaustion.

In continuous machine play, gamblers seek to lose themselves while the gambling industry seeks profit. Schull describes the strategic calculations behind game algorithms and machine ergonomics, casino architecture and "ambience management," player tracking and cash access systems--all designed to meet the market's desire for maximum "time on device.

Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. Published June 1st by Princeton University Press. More Details Other Editions 5. Friend Reviews.

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Addiction by Design , please sign up.

Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Dec 13, Jen rated it it was amazing.

This is one of the best, most engaging academic books I have read in a long time. I am an academic, and my field of study is addiction. Needless to say, this kind of writing is totally my bag.

However, I didn't just enjoy this book because I am a total nerd for the subject matter. Schull is also just a really good writer. I found her text approachable and engaging.

She has a really excellent sense of narrative and flow, and her organization is linear, thematically sound, and well organized. I al This is one of the best, most engaging academic books I have read in a long time.

I also LOVE that her chapters are all about pages. All of this means that I read through it faster, processed the complex arguments more easily, and retained more of the content and message as I read along.

It's an interesting book, but it's also just really well designed and put together. I also appreciated that Schull doesn't pick the low hanging fruit of screamy social advocacy and calls of violence and victimization.

Instead, she very successfully shows how the terrain of problem gambling and the gambling industry have grown in symbiosis with one another for decades.

She shows how individual people are affected by that interaction not only on the casino floor, but also in schools, in casino headquarters, in research labs, testing facilities, in marketing agencies, and even in courts of law.

There a a lot of people affected--some of them badly, but blame is very difficult to pin to a single entity, person, technology, or device.

The message of this book, as I read it, is that the physical and psychological realm of machine-based gambling is a leviathan--a leviathan that we all had a hand in building in one way or another--and the shape that it takes today, both on the macro level of corporations and financial statistics and on the micro level of individual players and checking accounts, reveals a great deal about who we are, who we think that we are, and the moral structure of the modern world that we have constructed for ourselves.

One of the most fascinating books I've ever read. It had everything I love - architecture, design, psychology, business, public policy! I have no interest in gambling, so I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this book.

The book is thorough yet covers a lot of topics, including the environmental design of casinos, the design and ergonomics of machines, how electronic slot machines are mapped so it looks like the odds are better, why people gamble, the way games adapt to players, the massive amoun One of the most fascinating books I've ever read.

The book is thorough yet covers a lot of topics, including the environmental design of casinos, the design and ergonomics of machines, how electronic slot machines are mapped so it looks like the odds are better, why people gamble, the way games adapt to players, the massive amount of data collected by player reward cards, the actions of gaming industry lobby groups and impact on government policies, and theories and issues related to recovery from gambling addiction.

It is well-researched, written in an accessible way, and interspersed by real quotes and stories from game designers, casino managers, academic researchers, and gambling addicts.

The stories are integrated into the flow of the book, and not just tossed in as side-bar quotes. I suspect my husband will be pleased I've finished reading this so I'll stop talking about it It's that sort of book!

Jan 05, Daniel added it. In this book about how people who play video poker and slot machines play not for the reward of winning money, but for the reward of being able to play longer, there's list of preconditions for an activity that lets you get into the state of "flow" which you sometimes achieve, for instance, when programming where your sense of time fades along with your concern for the troubles of everyday life: 1.

The most striking aspect of this book for me is brought up early and often in this volume: gambling addicts know they're going to lose.

The incentives for the problem gambler have been assembled at the intersection of psychological disorder, product design, capitalist economics, and local regulation.

The objective: increase the time on device for an addicted customer. This interaction is the product of many defensible decisions, but has a devastating effect on the lives and finances of real peop The most striking aspect of this book for me is brought up early and often in this volume: gambling addicts know they're going to lose.

This interaction is the product of many defensible decisions, but has a devastating effect on the lives and finances of real people: so called "player extinction".

Simply fascinating. Feb 25, Michael Hughes added it. Read about half and quit only because the information is, for me, of limited utility. Make no mistake, though: this is a dense and carefully researched ethnography, one written with a journalist's gift for storytelling.

Very little jargon clouds Schull's prose, a rare thing in academic writing. Addiction by Design is recommended to anyone with an interest in the science of addiction and the ways profiteers manipulate the brain's reward system in order to separate people from their savings.

Oct 02, Konstantin Samoylov rated it it was amazing. Great overview of the gambling business and the addition it's thriving upon. Natasha shows how the gambling ecosystem is designed to create and develop the addiction.

The book reflects a solid research work that Natasha conducted. All theses are backed up by examples. All examples are concrete, detailed and linked to the sources.

That was a great read. I've never thought how thoroughly casinos research and design all sides of the gambling experience. AB experiments, big data analysis, user segmen Great overview of the gambling business and the addition it's thriving upon.

AB experiments, big data analysis, user segmentation etc. Mar 06, Dan'l Danehy-oakes rated it really liked it. Though the main text is only pages long, it took me nearly three weeks to read this volume on "Machine Gambling in Las Vegas".

It is dense, and there are another 79 pages of feetnote, many of which sent me skittering to the bibliography.

Dense in this case does not translate as "boring" or "hard to read. It makes the following case, more or less: 1 Gaming machines encourage problema Though the main text is only pages long, it took me nearly three weeks to read this volume on "Machine Gambling in Las Vegas".

It makes the following case, more or less: 1 Gaming machines encourage problematic addictive behavior. Double duh. They give enough wins and near-wins to keep a player hoping.

And blahblahblah, because 4 It turns out that problematic addictive behavior isn't about the desire to win after all: it's about getting in "the zone" and continuing to play.

The "zone" is not about winning and losing. It's like a self-destructive satori, if you will. This is exhaustively, and exhaustingly see above re: feetnote and bibliography , researched, documented, and verified by interviews with gamblers, ex-gamblers, and a host of people in "the industry," from casino owners to machine designers.

A whole chapter is devoted to attempts by government, researchers, medical professionals, people in the industry to "fix" the "problem" of addictive gambling.

Another is dedicated to attempts by addicts to "cure" themselves. Oh, and: there is a bunch of discussion of how those in the industry justify their business model, ranging from "it's our responsibility to shareholders to make as much money as legally possible," to "the problem isn't with our business model, it's with the addicts.

Machine gaming is much more profitable for casino owners than live gaming - so profitable that there is hardly a shop or gas station in Las Vegas that doesn't have its bank of electronic poker machines or straight slots.

Locals tend to prefer video poker to straight slots; tourists tend to prefer the slots. Anyway, an interesting book, at least for those at least vaguely interested in such things.

Aug 16, Theresa Claire Barton rated it it was amazing Shelves: reviewed. Machine gambling is, as prof dow-schull reveals, more bizarre beneath the surface.

Basically repeat gamblers will spend not just excessive -- barely physically plausible -- amounts of time gambling on machines. They will not go to the bathroom, not eat, and refuse to be disturbed.

Dow Schull cites cases where players did not move from their seats when a neighbor is on the floor convulsing from a heart attack, becoming an impediment to paramedics.

The genius of the game design is hardly revolutionary -- basic positive reinforcement with variable-reward scheduling -- rather the way the players are sucked in to the elusive 'zone,' the way the designers continually ratchet up the intensity of play, and the way the play perfectly stimulates some neural circuits that cause the players to spend maximum time on device is fascinating and horrifying.

Dow Schull's humble choice of subject matter, largely a vice of the elderly, the female, and the working class, and her appraisal of their inescapable hell TIL casinos will refill oxygen tanks and perscriptions if you play enough!

I'm struck by the similarity between wireheading where one stimulates the pleasures of one's brain and machine gambling. Also by the way our tiny smartphone 'addictions' could actually be so much worse.

Dec 06, Wilte rated it it was ok. I liked the psychological aspects on design the best, less so the ethnographic descriptions and the emphasis on addiction.

Modern cultures, he claimed, were distinguished by games involving a tension between agon and alea—the former demanding an assertion of will, the latter demanding surrender to chance.

Although video poker machines took in half as much money as three-reel slots per unit of time, they brought in twice as much revenue because gamblers played at them four times as long.

Upon further investigation it was discovered that the men were exiting a nearby showroom near the machines at the close of a revue performance and pestering the young women.

Yet the seeming alignment between players and the industry around the quest to manage contingency, I have argued throughout this book, masks asymmetries of risk and reward, control and compulsion, loss and gain.

Jul 07, Robert A rated it really liked it. Surprising, but quite academic book about gambling addiction to machines slot machines.

The machines have gotten more and more computerized and everything has been done to keep people playing for as long as possible.

Many people use machine gambling as a way to escape life and its p Surprising, but quite academic book about gambling addiction to machines slot machines.

Many people use machine gambling as a way to escape life and its problems. They want to get completely lost in the game.

They don't even really want to win, just keep playing. Many people lose all their savings and then need government assistance while casino's prosper.

This is especially a problem as many states have legalized gambling to raise revenues, but this creates many new problems.

An exhaustive look at an addiction you probably weren't aware of, and if you WERE aware of it you probably didn't know how complex it was.

There is no stone left unturned in this book. You get to look at every aspect of machine gambling addiction, from the people who make em to the people who put em out to the people who use em.

May slow down sometimes, but for the most part there's always a new piece of information that keeps you reading. After this, it's hard to look at slots the same way.

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3 Kommentare

  1. Im Vertrauen gesagt ist meiner Meinung danach offenbar. Ich berate Ihnen, zu versuchen, in google.com zu suchen

  2. Ich entschuldige mich, aber meiner Meinung nach lassen Sie den Fehler zu. Geben Sie wir werden es besprechen. Schreiben Sie mir in PM, wir werden reden.

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